What is Adaptive Therapy

What is Adaptive Therapy?

Adaptive Therapy finds itself under the CBT umbrella, founded on the premise that each of us is an organism made of up of a state of consciousness, a subconscious and a conscience that is embodied for its expression and service. To offer a method to find purpose, its important that this method be described in two ways.  1) For those that need evidence-based methods that prove effectiveness vs. anecdotal results, and  2) For those that lean toward spiritual healing.

The evidence-based research is underway for those that lean scientific. This methodology can also live within spiritual psychology, as the Self is recognized and seen as the real beingness of an individual, in contrast to personality being the identification of the person, as in some traditional

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psychological perspectives.  Adaptive Therapy recognizes the personality as a collection of beliefs that allow categorization which is found to be self-limiting. Anyone can modify their perceptions from experience and reframe them to generate instead a positive outcome, independent of personality.

It is important to recognize that it is not the goal of Adaptive Therapy to erase negative feelings. The goal, however, is to use these feelings productively to access the underlying core belief in the unconscious that is being violated. Doing so offers an opportunity to change the belief, thus removing the reason for the negative feeling. Negative feelings are messengers of imbalance attempting to communicate at a conscious level what beliefs are being held in the unconscious and are causing dissonance.

What causes dissonance?  The best way to understand dissonance is to observe its opposite polarity:  resonance.  When humans conform with their “programming,” they experience resonance which means synchronous vibration.  It’s also harmony and homeostasis.  When humans violate, or do not conform to their programming they experience dissonance which means discord, conflict, tension or clash. The aforementioned supports health and well-being.  The latter causes stress, which is a term that covers many different scenarios, but it means out of balance, not well.